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are in the stream. your money and national security at the polls in afghanistan. my cohost and digital producer is here. when afghans head to the polls, they are choosing a new direction, progressive, hopefully, but it has a tremendous impact on the u.s. and the u.s. investment to date. >> it's a new narrative. when most americans look at it, it's seen through war and violence. we have afghans tweeting in, and forward. we have this: on the flipside: >> then we have: who will lead afghanistan as they begin a new era, eight men are vying to replace hamid karzai. representing the first democratic transfer of power in the country since 2001 when taliban. in the decade since the u.s. invested money, mann power and sacrificed more than 2,000 lives, helping to build the foundation for a new way to govern. while the election brings hope. it brings concerns, rumours of voter fraud and election rigging that plagued afghan politics. every surface along with the taliban carrying out high-profile attacks in the hopes of scaring away voters from the polls and undermining the election. it highlights concerns
hello and welcome to an "america toni" special report. i'm joie chen. tough times in afghanistan as a country takes its first steps to a new future. our special focus on the taliban and afghanistan today continues now.after the fault lines documentary, this is taliban country. that country today is a powder keg. after decades of fighting, outside forces and inter-tribal faceoffs, looking to the future about questions about what's next. as u.s. forces prepare to leave there is reason for hope. last week's presidential election defied prediction. 350,000 strong security presence was far less than feared. it was according to outside monitors a big win for democracy. and a setback to the taliban which had vowed to disrupt the vote. >> i mean if it's up to them, no elections at all. but we want the elections, we want somebody who will deal with the taliban, evolve that issue and then resolve that issue and then come out and vote. >> beyond the relatively smooth election, the limits on the taliban's power, as evidenced by fault lines documentary, this is taliban country, in which the g
, the wind down of the war in afghanistan and current foreign-policy. the council of foreign relations member and former analyst is the author of six nonfiction books including the village, the strongest tribe and his 2011 release the wrong war. >> host: why do you call the afghanistan war "the wrong war"? >> guest: because we had a strategy in place for the war and we shouldn't have a strategy of trying to build a nation with 31 million tribesmen hurtling into the night century. that was too much. so it was the wrong war for the strategy we chose. >> maybe you could do that in japan or germany after world war ii, but doing it and afghanistan was the wrong war for that strategy. >> host: what would have been the right one? >> guest: very simple. we should have finished al qaeda in 2001. our general who was there before the interest obutfor the interel i think all of us think back. we were attacked on 9/11. 3,000 americans died, more than pearl harbor. we have al qaeda and we had osama bin laden trapped in the mountains called tora bora. we didn't finish him off and then we let any skate over
about the elections held in afghanistan over the last week and it's all record number of men and women turning out to vote, despite the risk of violence. we will talk with afghan expert gayle tzemach lemmon and then we will turn to a conversation with grammy nominated hip-hop artist christylez bacon about his new ourand will close conversation tonight with an amazing performance. coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> this week officials continue to count ballots from the record number of men and women in afghanistan who went to the polls to vote in an election that may result in the first him credit transfer of power in the country's history. warning me now to talk about what this election may mean for afghanistan is gayle tzemach lemmon, who has written extensively about that country, including a new york times bestseller, "the dressmaker of khair khana. in, what doright you make of what happened, because it seems that people around the world are heralding the way these elections turned out. correction you have had an att
at a critical moment in afghanistan's future before an election that could lead to the country's first peaceful transition of power or not. strong signals suggest that peaceful might be unattainable. a stunning reminder of the taliban's ability to wreak havoc in the afghan capitol. four gunmen attack a hotel popular with westerners. >> they carried pistols and were able to hide the pistols in their socks. we got information right away, and sent our police commander forces that there was an operation going on. >> attackers went to the restaurant and starting shooting before moving through the rest of the hotel. one journalist was shot dead along with his wife and two young children. the four attackers were also killed. afghan authorities say they appeared to be about 18 years old. the taliban spokesmen claimed responsible for the attacks, saying . . . the horrific assault comes as afghanistan prepares for presidential elections the taliban has vowed to disrupt. in a rare look inside the taliban, al jazeera "faultlines" document try unit traveled with afghanistan fighters including a 23-year-old
.m. eastern on c-span 2. >> next, a discussion about this weekend's alexeis in afghanistan. after that, a conversation on the financial brokering practice known as high frequency trading. at 11:00 p.m., "q & a" with arthur matt taibbi, talking about his book, "the divide." >> next a discussion about the future of afghanistan and this weekend's presidential alexei. from "washington journal," this is 45 minutes. at c-span.org. michael e. o'hanlon is a seniors -- senior fellow at the brookings institute. us talk about the voting in afghanistan. it is gone smoothly. guest: it looks good. there is a long way to go. as you are aware, you have to get 50% of the vote in afghanistan to win. there will be a runoff almost for sure. ran.ate candidates who chances are nobody got more than 35 or 40%. there will have to be a runoff. whoever does not make the runoff will have to decide how they want to react to that. do they blame fraud? do they protest? there is a long way to go in the process. it appears to have been a very good day. security forces protected the polling sites very well. the people
americans, and it should remind us why the u.s. went to war in afghanistan in the first place, and what's at stake for u.s. national security interests, and what could happen if we withdraw troops to quickly. unfortunately, american popular support for the war has dipped considerably. some of the latest polling shows it is below 20%. i think this is because of the western media bias for reporting on violence and bad news coming out of the country, but i think it's also the result of president karzai and his continuous criticism of american policies there despite the massive amount of assistance in blood and treasure the u.s. has spent there, but the white house has been reluctant to talk about the war and really spell out for the american people what is at stake, so i think all of these combined have led to the dismal view about afghanistan. the point is with these elections we have an opportunity to reframe the debate, and we can focus on what is right about the u.s. mission in afghanistan and what has been accomplished. i think this is a good time for the white house to be clear that
for their last months in afghanistan. about forty thousand are still here - by the end of the year, there'll be just eight thousand. we traveled to afghanistan in the midst of this transition. but on the base we found a story that isn't being told. the people doing the day-to-day work here are mostly civilian contract workers - men from india and nepal, who traveled to a war zone just for the promise of a good job. for many of them, that promise turned out to be a lie. they ended up deceived and indebted, victims of human traffickers who thrive on military contracts. fault lines examines the lives of these workers - and investigates how the american military has come to rely on an indentured workforce. camp marmal is the largest base in northern afghanistan. nato's mission here centers on training the afghan national army. >> the complexity, when we first got here i started thinking about it. it almost becomes overwhelming. >> this is the us regional garrison commander, responsible for daily operations in the north. >> there's a lot of great contractors that come up here. local nationals,
-- vane west van karzai karzai. --than karzai. he had been the king of afghanistan's personal physician. well-known here. he's to work in washington for the world bank. he was the finance minister and moved back after the fall of the taliban. they are all familiar with the west. even visitors like myself have had the chance to get to know all three of them. that part is promising. american forces to stay. they know they need help. they are less caught up in some of the back-and-forth that president karzai has had with the obama white house. they're going to have their challenges. a promisingit is top three. cnn is reporting a very heavy security presence. despite the threat by the taliban, that did not deter people from voting. the fingers were dipped in purple ink. we did see some of the violence with the death of the photographer that was killed on friday. guest: there have been some high-profile assassinations in the weeks. they figured out that al qaeda did not get support when they bombed schools. of the taliban has gone after high profile legal targets. that is who they have wante
satellite corp. 2013] >> coming up, a preview of today's presidential elections in afghanistan followed by a marine corps future with general james amos. testifying on the budget for the u.s. and foreign operations. let's take a case which got a $1.9 billion settlement levied at them. there was the deferred prosecution agreements. laundered as much as it hundred $50 million for drug cartels. minorly did they commit financial and technical infractions, we are talking about an organization operating at the top of the illegal narcotics pyramid. this is a major criminal enterprise. they admitted it. they did not fund it, that is on then. that is a failure of the regulatory system. they were in league with truly dangerous and violent people and the worstem out with kind of behavior that a band can be involved with. nobody does a single day in jail? that is outrageous. it is even more outrageous when you look at in comparison with who does go to jail, people at the very bottom of the illegal sellingamid, people drugs. they go to jail for real-time, five years, 10 years. at the same time, they
morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thank you for coming to discuss afghanistan. we have ael o'hanlon, very distinguished group of american and afghan individuals and officials to talk with us -- former officials and continued scholars and experts on afghanistan to talk about the transitions underway. this upcoming saturday is afghanistan's presidential election. it will probably not be the clues of round, there will more likely than not be a runoff. one will ultimately get a majority in the late spring or even sooner. we will talk more about those details in a second. we have -- see did from your left to right, former ambassador , career foreign service officer and ambassador also in bahrain and algeria. he and his father were both ambassadors to afghanistan, making them along with the adams the only father-son team to be ambassador to the same country. the depth of commitment by this family to this important country. to be very active in his interests in afghanistan. he and i were there recently on a research trip and he has been many times since being ambassador. general joh
to the polls in the presidential elections in the first-ever democratic transfer of power and afghanistan's history. it could take up to six weeks to tally results. former afghan ambassador to canada and france discussed the election. this is an hour. >> thank you all for coming. as you know, the elections took place on saturday, and our panel will discuss what we know so far and what the consequences and likelihood of those elections are likely to be. i am the executive director of the partnership for secure america, and we are proud and happy to cosponsor this panel with the alliance in support of the afghan people, asap. the alliance itself is a group of individuals who are in a coalition dedicated to support the progress made by the afghan people over the last decade. the psa partnership for secure america was an organization founded in 2005 dedicated to the idea that we ought to promote fact-based, bipartisan approach to foreign-policy and national security. over the years we have issued a statement on key policy issues, and we have a very exciting, very interesting model, congressio
, afghanistan. as the us and nato prepares to pull out most of their forces later this year, i travelled here to try to see what life is like in areas of afghanistan under the rule of the taliban. after days of negotiations, through intermediaries - i was told i would be allowed in, with a camera. >> i'm actually quite nervous and the reason is that five years ago when i tried to embed with a group of insurgents in helmand i was kidnapped and i was held for a week. i was lucky and managed to escape from them but still i don't hope that i will end up in the same situation. >> this sort of access is incredibly rare... its also risky - this is taliban country. >> charkh is a cluster of dusty settlements surrounding a small, central town. the taliban of charkh were burying their dead. >> one of the two taliban fighters killed in an attack on a local afghan army base. a lot of inhabitants from this village in charkh have gathered today. >> they're here to pay their respects. they're here also to mourn, and also show that they are proud. >> the dead man's father was amongst the mourners. >> many of
. the office costs and get the dates. i know. on the this saturday's presidential election afghanistan certainly signals change that the ongoing comic con is not stepping down after twelve years in us led forces drawing down. perhaps even packing up. you could say is a mix of anticipation and foreboding. anticipation of the climax of a campaign where tv debates have proved hugely popular with has been much attention for boating following the taliban's vowed to disrupt the poll last week's bombing in siege of a couple anti landmine charity that left two dead including a girl just one of the string of attacks deadly violence in afghanistan up to the fifteen percent last year just as foreign troops were drawn down trodden is further heightened the week of regional players in these elections neighbors have all stepped up aid to afghanistan as they jostled for influence officially pakistan insists the platforms the people many in islam above the speed and in india on some of the candidates called delhi accuses pakistan in attacks targeting its interests inside of afghanistan. with that that
>> just an hours drive from kabul, is charkh district, afghanistan. as the us and nato prepares to pull out most of their forces later this year, i travelled here to try to see what life is like in areas of afghanistan under the rule of the taliban. after days of negotiations, through intermediaries - i was told i would be allowed in, with a camera. >> i'm actually quite nervous and the reason is that five years ago when i tried to embed with a group of insurgents in helmand i was kidnapped and i was held for a week. i was lucky and managed to escape from them but still i don't hope that i will end up in the same situation. >> this sort of access is incredibly rare... its also risky - this is taliban country. >> charkh is a cluster of dusty settlements surrounding a small, central town. the taliban of charkh were burying their dead. >> one of the two taliban fighters killed in an attack on a local afghan army base. a lot of inhabitants from this village in charkh have gathered today. >> they're here to pay their respects. they're here also to mourn, and also show that they are p
elections in afghanistan. at least two rainbows were wounded saturday morning a blast of a polling center in eastern afghanistan will go our province. a district governor gave that information. it was the first attack against voters in the country's presidential election soul fall. the injured were shifted to a district hospital in the province some sixty km south of afghanistan's capital kabul meanwhile current afghan prison karzai has cast his vote in kabul karzai is constitutionally barred from running for third consecutive five year term. but he urged all afghan voters to take part in the election the election marks the nation's fourth democratic transfer of power or through the ballot box altogether around twelve million voters all eligible to cast their ballots. apple was six thousand polling centers. there are the contenders in the race opinion polls showed three candidates are frontrunners the trouble of dylan at the leading opposition figure in the country and the runner up in the two thousand and nine polls. i shrug on e cummings i is a form of finance minister and former world
is the chairman and ceo of the moby group. one of the largest media companies in afghanistan. moby houses the country's most popular television channel and approximately 15 million daily viewers. last year it covered the first afghanistan presidential debate to include all major candidates. saad mohseni believes the proliferation of media in the past 12 years is afghanistan's most precious achievement. he is looking to bring this entrepreneurship to the country's including iran, and iraq. i'm pleased to have him them back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> iran is up and running. >> yes. we are in the middle east now. >> you were not trained as a media entrepreneur. you were a banker. when afghanistan changed, when they threw out the taliban, use opportunity. with one little radio station. >> we were lucky. it was more of an accidental business. one thing led to another. lo and behold we have 20 companies. >> and partners like rupert murdoch. >> he is a minority shareholder in a company. >> let's talk about the election. >> a success, i think. >> 7 million people. when they were thr
. booktv.org. >> next, we look at the political life of afghanistan with our selected author. this is just over an hour and half. >> it is pleasure to be back here at columbia and particularly in this room where i might mention that 17 years ago in january 1997 i chaired a meeting which was opened by then dean lisa anderson who is president of the american university in cairo. a meeting where we had a dialogue with the first delegation of the taliban who came to the united states. they came to new york 3-4 months after they took control of kabul to ask for afghanistan's un seat not realizing that wasn't within the power of the secretary general. of the people who were there, the delegation was led my a man who later became their foreign minister and i saw in kabul a week ago. he is a con -- he was an intern for some time. he is currently a member of the afghan high peace council in kabul and reconciled and another man who was the minister of refugees and was assassinated after returning from a meeting in dubai trying to start a peace conference. the chairman went on later to become the cen
was delivered was wounded in afghanistan as we begin our special coverage of the presidential election that. but the time about his pledge to make as bloody as possible. it is brought into the greek economy as the euro zone signs all along the way to learn that this little relief for business and is still struggling the oldest city all the policies that i'm insane drops of warm to come back and ridges of the siberian winter. the list the eye. stupid rules. this is ok to mess with the trip grounds that day. mckay says it's freaking practical cooperation with russia but the military and civilian it's irresponsible beagle cool small screws alec station on crime in a multiple choice people i've now with more summary of what exactly is the non same. well falling on the history of meeting on tuesday media released a statement announcing the suspension of all civilian and military cooperation hot with rice and for more than a decade russia and nato have been quiet reading on crucial security issues such as fighting terrorism and drug trafficking and also ideally not cooperating with disarmament an
. and security concerns as afghanistan prepares for its presidential election. >>> new information is adding to the mist surrounding the aledged fort hood shootings. brandon is live in killeen, texas. what else have you learned today? >> this news come as a complete shock, total survise. you mentioned the army releasing his service record, and he received awards for his service. the 34-year-old was at one point deployed in iraq, but officials say he was never involved in combat. he was on medication and in the process of being diagnosed for ptsd, and he was upset about being granted a 24 hour leave to at ten his mother's funeral. but he was not seen or viewed as someone who has violent tendencies, and his actions come as a total shock to his neighbors. >> we have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates an unstable psychiatric history. and we believe that to be the fundamental underlying cause of factors. there may have been a verbal altercation with other soldier, or soldiers. and there is possible that preceded the shooting. >> he purchased the gun that is about te
in afghanistan. her reporter colleague was injur injured. security has been intensified across the country. >>> the next stage in looking for any trace of the missing ma airliner. australian and british searches deploy probes. >>> and tim peeks tells us how he is choosing a name for his first space mission. >>> hello, everyone. it is a defining moment for afghanistan's future foreign combat troops are well advanced in packing up so all are out of the country by the end of the year. afghanistan will choose a new president to replace hamid karzai. two respected journalists working for the associated press news agency. one anja needinghouse was killed instantly. her reporter was seriously injured but stable in hospital. they were e traveling with election observers. 12 million people out of more than 30 million can vote in art's election. in the lead up to this week general, many risk their own safety to attend centers to apply pore a voters registration card. 350,000 afghan soldiers and police will secure the venues right across afghanistan. there are now eight candidates to choose from. the
. >> in texas - remembering those randomly gunned down at fort hood. >> the votesar cast in afghanistan. -- votes are cast in afghanistan. we'll watch it in the weeks ahead. >> two decades ago humanity showed its worst - nearly a million people were butchered in rwanda. cut down by machetes as a country turned on itself. >> vigils and memories to honour all that was lost. a frame of remembrance is travelling over the country. >> 20 years ago today a plane with the president in it was shot down. >> i'm here to ask god to keep me well, thank him and to ask that the genocide never happens again. >> there has been services across the country. people gatored at a church. members of the ruling hutu group, tutsis and moderates. >> people have been divided after belgium colonized rwanda in 1916. it introduced identity carts. the minority tutees being an elight over tutsis. 20,000 tutsis were killed in riots. in 1994 the president's plane was shot down, setting off the 100 days of violence. many girls were raped and some made painful choices whether to keep the children. they are still trying to
secretary of defense talks about counterinsurgency, the wind down of the war in afghanistan and current foreign-policy. the council for relations member and former rand analyst is the author of six nonfiction books including "the village," "the strongest tribe: war, politics and the end game in iraq" and his 2011 release "the wrong war: grit, strategy and the way out of afghanistan". . >> why did you call the afghanistan war the wrong war? >> guest: we had a strategy that was misplaced for the war. we shouldn't have had a strategy of trying to build a nation with 31 million tribesmen going headlong into the ninth century. that was too much. it was the wrong war for the strategy we chose. maybe you could do that in japan or germany after world war ii but doing it in afghanistan which is a pile of rocks in the little of nowhere was the wrong war for that strategy. >> guest: what would have been right war? >> guest: we should have finished al qaeda in 2001. our general who was fair, more than just a general, all of us, think back, we were attacked on 9/11, 3,000 americans died, more americ
afghanistan to our own -- to their own devices. there is no government in power, and we did not care. this was the end of the cold war, the first bush administration, and we kept our hands off. this was a bit of a mistake on our part, as well as in strategic terms because the minute we -- they compost something that we wanted, we left them to their own devices. later on, the chickens came home to roost. that was the front in which the 9/11 attacks were planned. at this point you can say this is becoming ancient history and al qaeda has bigger sanctuaries in pakistan or iraq or syria today, so why do we even care. that is the simple answer and i would like to keep it that way, that afghanistan no longer has al qaeda sanctuaries still to be true. i would like to preserve that a combo spent by giving the afghans enough strength so that they can hold together their own country. we are justs is about their and they show that yesterday, doing 95% of the work yet again. they are doing 95% of the work and taking 95% of the casualties of all coalition forces and yesterday, they were the ones
at is afghanistan. he has not said much about not,nistan, modi has but it is sensible that he would maintain as close relations a s as possible with afghanistan. if the country next to you is a problem, the country next to them is a friend. he is unlikely to be interested indian rolet of security in afghanistan. he has not, i think left us many clues and a lot will depend on what happens in afghanistan. accident i put on continuity in afghanistan will show up in other places as well, if modi is successful in forming a government. indian foreign policy tends not to turn on a dime. in the party manifesto, there was a delphic statement about the need to re-examine and nuclear policy's which is now centered on no first use. after a certain amount of press commentary, modi himself made a statement that i did not say we were going to can do no first use policy. i think you've will see some policy changes to my that it will not be like flicking a switch. you are of the changes likely to see is in that direction the government liens -on some kind of- leans on some kind of issues particularly in the
on afghanistan and is one of the countries all in difficult parts of the world and difficult challenges she spent much of her career working on including a couple of excellent books about counternarcotics into the topic of the current research project she wrote a book about afghanistan called aspiration and end of the lens and was going to be an observer in last month's first round until violence precluded that which is a natural starting point for some of the discussion i know she is going to get into it about what has been going on in these last few weeks. next to her is the ambassador retired foreign service officer who spent more of the difficult years and most difficult place you could imagine as u.s. ambassador to pakistan in the 2010 to 2012 period you will recall included not only the osama bin laden rate but a number of other challenges to put it mildly in the relations as a distinguished career for which he deceived the week received the award from secretary clinton on the retirement in 2012 notable than the previous assignments in iraq and a number of other european countries in washin
, as ambassador nuemann said, he has a lot of support among tajiks in the northern and western part of afghanistan. but because he was very -- a the latee confidant of massoud, he is seen as a radical by a lot of pashtuns. though yesterday you had a campaign rally in kandahar. from all the candidates, he had the biggest turnout. which means that he has the biggest rally in kandahar. which is a bit surprising for everybody. to zalmai rassoul, he is considered a very weak person, not only him but the vice president he has. his second vice president used to be a governor. it will help him to secure some votes of women. as entire team is seen as, we say in afghanistan, a just saying team. whatever karzai says. >> i just want to follow up on something general allen set. this is an excellent analysis. i went to tee up one issue. president karzai is still 70% popular in afghanistan. he is not 70% popular in washington, but he is 70% popular in afghanistan. i'm trying to think through this question ron and i were focusing on. what are rassoul's real prospects? there is a certain undercurrent that if rasso
the i should. photographs afghanistan's presidential election with reports that the court. despite an increase in taliban attacks leading up to the ball. he sells its mobile phone giant is time to hang up on squeezing trouble is wrong everyone now it's global warming charges are quite outdated. so one of customers expected the bill to go up into the dam was built on this program. we invite the city to be won with a lake by khalid bit late to join it's about continuing exploration of stuff inside it has been the spiritual side of this ancient natural the new. they want. it is up to natural is no one am here at most one thirty in the morning in afghanistan and that's the way we stop the sour. accounting for the one in afghanistan for ten student voting under the shadow of the taliban's terror threat. this could take several weeks before the successor to president karzai's main opposition captain of staging the latest developments from kabul. we did hear from the independent election commission. earlier the official tally is for civilians killed forty three wounded. intel contacts in
in afghanistan, hosted by the alliance in support of the afghan people. this is an hour. >> thank you for coming. we have a panel called the afghan elections in the future of afghan relations. the elections took place on saturday in afghanistan, and our panel will discuss what we know the consequences unlikelihood of those elections are likely to be. ofm the executive director the partnership for a secure america, and we are happy to cosponsor with the alliance and support of afghan people asap. the alliance itself is a group of individuals who are in a coalition dedicated to support the progress made by the afghan people over the last decade. the psa in partnership with secure america is an organization founded in 2005 and dedicated to the idea that they fact-based policy. we have issued a statement on key policy issues, and we have a very exciting, very interesting model in the program we have been doing since 2009. i want to get right to the panel discussion. moderator,oduce our who is a senior for the center for american progress. we also welcome c-span 3. we are at #afghan elections panel.
several months leading up to the vote. first transfer of presidential power in afghanistan since the end of the telegram's rule in 2001. karzai has led the country for more than 12 years. there are about 6500 polling stations across else can stand -- across afghanistan. the "associated press" reports the polls are most but we could have partial reports as early as tomorrow. we will bring you updates on the c-span networks was upcoming appear on season, a look at the future of the marine corps, and then u.s. ambassador to the united nations, samantha power. she testified on the u.s. budget for the u.n. and foreign operations. later, president of the world bank will be talking about the global inequality. like the really gets to me because i get to know these young men and women when i am out there, and i keep seeing some of them killed or amputated, and i want out of there as fast as anybody else and let the afghans fight their own fight. i think we have to do it in a sayent way, what i try to to mothers when i am talking with him. we cannot get too hung up on the defects on iraq or the d
of afghanistan after twelve long years, al jazeera's fault lines travelled there. >> the taliban fighters, they're running towards the base now. they're trying to raid the base. >> over several days, we gained extraordinary access to a group of self-proclaimed taliban fighters. >> and the mortars are landing in the areas where we are. >> it was an insight, in part at least, into what the war in afghanistan looks like - from the other side. >> the fighter jet is still in the air circling looking for a target. >> kabul, afghanistan afghan president hamid karzai is currently refusing to sign a treaty that would leave a small nato force in the country. if nothing changes, all foreign soldiers will leave by the end of this year. in secret, karzai has been negotiating with the taliban, in order to avoid a full-blown civil war. since 2005, the taliban has clawed back territory. they now dominate large parts of the country. >> but approximately only one hour's drive from here, right over behind the mountain there, is logar. and in logar there's still a war going on. >> i wanted to see what the war look
is killed, the other seriously injured -- to journalist are shot in afghanistan. getting down to business, france's new government holds his new cabinet meeting. the pressure is on as the fed government rose increasingly disappointed in president hollande and his team. the hunt for the black boxes of the missing malaysia and plan intensifies, as the flight recorder will soon run out of batteries. >> we begin this edition in afghanistan where there has been a deadly attack. two western journalists have been shot in the east of the country. news agencyed press has confirmed its photographer was killed while its reporter, kathy gannon, was wounded in the shooting. claim there has been no of responsibility, but the attack comes on the eve of afghanistan's presidential elections. the country's taliban has vowed poll which will see president hamid karzai step down after over a decade in power. >> it's the talk of the town am a behind the opec windows of the black diamond beauty parlor, saturday's election is on everyone's lips. >> it's everyone's responsibility to cast their ballot. these candi
york. we'll begin today's show is yesterday's election in afghanistan. will it change anything? what will happen to the taliban and terrorism as american troops leave? >>> we'll also talk about ukraine and the middle east peace talks with great penl. >>> then i sit down with michael lewis. he says wall street is rigged, that some traders have an unfair advantage skimming money out of your pockets and into their own. but is he right? watch and find out. >>> also in the wake of the ft. hood shooting, we'll introduce you to an army general with a solution to the problem of mentally unstable soldiers with guns, and we'll tell you why he can't get his way in washington. >>> finally, a shakespearean tragedy related to syria, but it's not what you're thinking. this one will actually make you smile. but first here's my take. for those of you tired of the coverage of malaysian airlines flight 370, i want you to try an experiment. when you're with a group of friends whose eyes might roll over when you even bring up the issue, ask them what they think happened to the plane. very quickly you wil
america" reporting from washington. i'm katty kay. on the eve of elections in afghanistan, one foreign journalist is killed and another wounded after an afghan policeman opened fire on their car. four weeks after malaysia flight 370 went missing, the search for the plane now goes underwater, but the clock is ticking on finding those black boxes. and from president to painter, george w bush shows off his brush strokes with portraits of world leaders. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. in just a few hours, the people of afghanistan will go to the polls for the first democratic transfer of power in the country's history. these elections have been marked by a surge in violence. today two foreign journalists were shot, one fatally by an afghan policeman. from afghanistan, the bbc's karen allen has this report. >> the chilling aftermath of a targeted attack on the eve of historic elections in afternoon. this was part -- afghanistan, this was a convoy escorting election workers to safety. two female journalists were sitting in the back. a policem
a polling station and afghanistan the blast went off in the logo province as the country votes for new presidents to pose threats by the taliban to stop at nothing to disrupt the election a lot about cars and stole millions standing out to kept that promise this is the capital for talks. incredibly big concerns about security but that has not deterred of voters that a tremendous excitement on the ground here especially in kabul online polling centers. security is incredibly tight and people here say they are ready for a change cousin tommy karzai has been in power since the fall of the top bunk is barred from running again his departure along with that of international forces at the end of the year it means that the stakes are extraordinarily high now the tub on how to waste as you mentioned a violent campaign to disrupt the elections try to steer people away from polling that has anything to deter voters from the things that are concerned about the provinces with a group a stronger that we have heard reports of taleban fighters threatening people not to vote and already of blasts in a
you for your insights. interesting. appreciate your time. >> coming up, women in afghanistan struggled for basic human right for decades. political changes are raising concerns. a leading female voice from the afghan government will join us. >> al jazeera journalists in prison in egypt faced a day in court, leading to another day in court. we'll explain. what do you think. join the conversation: >> women have made great strides in afghanistan gan society. many feel it could slip away because afghanistan is at a crossroads. as the votes are counted, the future of the country is uncertain. a bilateral agreement is yet to be signed by the government. security concerns are mounting sips the possible taliban resurgence and women fear losing rights and freedoms they fought so hard to gain. i had a chance to speak to fawzia koofi, an extraordinary leader in a country where years ago women were shunned from public life and girls barred from school. she is a member of the parliament, and the first elected to be the deputy speaker of the assembly. she is making life better for her own
on the facebook page or tweet us. >> in a few moments, a forum on this weekend's election in afghanistan. and a little over an hour, the bipartisan policy center hosting a discussion on the future of long-term insurance. after that, an update on how many people have signed up for health insurance under the affordable care act. that we will re-air a conversation about a bill that would shield journalists from prosecution who are protecting their sources. will have a couple of live events tomorrow on the c-span networks. secretary of state john kerry will testify before the senate foreign relations committee on national security and foreign .olicies you can join that conversation on facebook and twitter. be coveringwe will a defense department briefing on u.s. strategy and operations in africa, including peacekeeping and anti-terrorism efforts. recent forum on the elections in afghanistan, hosted by the alliance in support of the afghan people. this is is an hour. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2014] >> thank you a
.s. has achieved in afghanistan, afghanistan is not iraq. >> rose: we continue this evening with a conversation about online education with the former president of yale university, rick levin. >> we have a woman in bangladesh, she was a product of -- she was involved in abusive relationship with her husband. she escaped from her situation and a friend of hers and herself decided to start a bakery. she went online and took an accounting course, a marketing course, how to run a small business course, and this woman in bangladesh is now running a successful bakery enterprise and from coursera. >> she, it gave her a life. >> rose: and we conclude this evening with a conversation about confidence, claire ship man and katty kay wrote a new book called "the confidence code", the science and art of self-assurance. >> we started writing this book because we would interview women all across america, women in incredible positions of important and came across this self-doubt, people you think would be brimming with confidence would talk to us how they were just lucky to be in the right
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